How to stop favoritism

Try to bring two groups together by discussing a shared and important goal for them.
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Happier teams

How to stop favoritism

Favoring you own group is a human trait, which has been clearly illustrated in some classic studies by psychologists Muzafer and Carolyn Sharif. Twelve-year-old boys were divided into two teams that competed against each other during a stay at camp. Prior to the competition, many of the boys had their best friend in the other group. After it, 90 percent had their best friend in their own group.
In this experiment with the boys, the competition lasted for almost a week. The more competitions they did, the wider the gap between the groups grew. The groups, called the Rattlesnakes and the Eagles, started to insult each other and became increasingly hostile. But then the car delivering food to the camp got stuck in the mud and the only way to free it was through everyone working together. Both the Rattlesnakes and the Eagles had to push the car, which made them friends again. When everyone is needed to achieve an objective, groups can come together and playing favorites can stop.